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Philip Drake Eitzman

from Lake Elmo, MN
Age ~67

Philip Eitzman Phones & Addresses

  • 2470 Lansing Ave, Lake Elmo, MN 55042 (651) 773-5077
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • Saint Paul, MN

Publications

Us Patents

Method And Apparatus For Making A Nonwoven Fibrous Electret Web From Free-Fiber And Polar Liquid

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US Patent:
6375886, Apr 23, 2002
Filed:
Oct 8, 1999
Appl. No.:
09/415566
Inventors:
Seyed A. Angadjivand - Woodbury MN
Michael G. Schwartz - Hugo MN
Philip D. Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN
Marvin E. Jones - Grant MN
Assignee:
3M Innovative Properties Company - St. Paul MN
International Classification:
H05B 716
US Classification:
264460, 264 6, 264115, 264122
Abstract:
A method and apparatus for charging fibers that contain a nonconductive polymer. A polar liquid is sprayed onto free-fibers and the free-fibers are then collected to form an entangled nonwoven fibrous web that may contain a portion of the polar liquid. The nonwoven web is then dried By applying an effective amount of polar liquid onto the nonconductive free-fibers before forming the nonwoven web followed by drying the individual fibers become charged. The method and apparatus enable the fibers to be charged during web manufacture without subsequent processing.

Method And Apparatus For Making A Fibrous Electret Web Using A Wetting Liquid And An Aqueous Polar Liquid

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US Patent:
6406657, Jun 18, 2002
Filed:
Oct 8, 1999
Appl. No.:
09/415291
Inventors:
Philip D. Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN
Alan D. Rousseau - Stillwater MN
Assignee:
3M Innovative Properties Company - St. Paul MN
International Classification:
D06B 300
US Classification:
264340, 264436, 427121, 4274344, 307400
Abstract:
A method for imparting an electrostatic charge to a nonwoven fibrous web. The fibrous web is wetted with a wetting liquid , followed by being saturated with an aqueous polar liquid and drying. The resulting dried product is an electret article that could be used as an air filter in, for example, a respirator.

Method Of Making A Fibrous Electret Web Using A Nonaqueous Polar Liquid

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US Patent:
6454986, Sep 24, 2002
Filed:
Oct 8, 1999
Appl. No.:
09/416216
Inventors:
Philip D. Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN
Alan D. Rousseau - Stillwater MN
Marvin E. Jones - Grant MN
Seyed A. Angadjivand - Woodbury MN
Assignee:
3M Innovative Properties Company - St. Paul MN
International Classification:
D06M 13127
US Classification:
264442, 264101, 264344, 264345, 264346
Abstract:
A method of charging fibrous webs with nonaqueous polar liquids. A web that contains nonconductive fibers is wetted with a nonaqueous polar liquid The web is then substantially dried to provide a fibrous electret web. The fibrous electret web can be used as a filter in a filtration face mask that is adapted to cover the nose and mouth of the wearer. The present method has the advantage over known charging methods in that the nonaqueous liquid requires less energy for drying than is required for aqueous liquids. Additionally, many filter webs can be directly wetted with nonaqueous liquids, which cannot be easily wetted with aqueous liquids.

Process Of Making A Fibrous Electret Web

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US Patent:
6824718, Nov 30, 2004
Filed:
Jun 4, 2002
Appl. No.:
10/162753
Inventors:
Philip D. Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN
Alan D. Rousseau - Stillwater MN
Assignee:
3M Innovative Properties Company - St. Paul MN
International Classification:
D06M 13127
US Classification:
264101, 264340, 264344, 264345
Abstract:
A method for imparting an electrostatic charge to a nonwoven fibrous web. The fibrous web is contacted with a liquid solution that includes water and a non-aqueous water soluble component, followed by drying. The resulting dried product is an electret article that could be used as an air filter in, for example, a respirator.

Apparatus For Making A Nonwoven Fibrous Electret Web From Free-Fiber And Polar Liquid

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US Patent:
20020110610, Aug 15, 2002
Filed:
Feb 12, 2002
Appl. No.:
10/074930
Inventors:
Seyed Angadjivand - Woodbury MN, US
Michael Schwartz - Hugo MN, US
Philip Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN, US
Marvin Jones - St. Paul MN, US
Assignee:
3M Innovative Properties Company
International Classification:
B32B035/00
US Classification:
425/083100, 425/174000
Abstract:
An apparatus for charging fibers that contain a nonconductive polymer. A polar liquid is sprayed onto free-fibers and the free-fibers are then collected to form an entangled nonwoven fibrous web that may contain a portion of the polar liquid. The nonwoven web is then dried By applying an effective amount of polar liquid onto the nonconductive free-fibers before forming the nonwoven web followed by drying the individual fibers become charged. The apparatus can enable the fibers to be charged during web manufacture without subsequent processing.

Respirator That Has Inward Nose Region Fold With High Level Conformation

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US Patent:
20110315144, Dec 29, 2011
Filed:
Jun 25, 2010
Appl. No.:
12/823259
Inventors:
Philip D. Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN, US
Dean R. Duffy - Woodbury MN, US
International Classification:
A62B 18/02
US Classification:
12820619
Abstract:
A flat fold filtering face piece respirator that includes a mask body and a harness . The mask body includes a filtering structure that contains a cover web and a filtration layer that contains electrically-charged microfibers. The filtering structure is folded over upon itself in a nose region of the mask body to be at least 1 centimeter or more wide and to extend across the upper perimeter of the mask body in a generally straight line when the respirator is in the folded condition. The filtering structure has a deflection greater than about 0.5 millimeters and has a recoverability of at least 40% in the folded condition. A mask body having this construction is beneficial in that it does not need to use a nose foam to obtain a snug fit over the nose.

Method Of Isolating And Purifying A Biomacromolecule

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US Patent:
54688477, Nov 21, 1995
Filed:
Mar 10, 1994
Appl. No.:
8/209700
Inventors:
Steven M. Heilmann - Afton MN
Gary J. Drtina - Woodbury MN
Philip D. Eitzman - Lake Elmo MN
Louis C. Haddad - Mendota Heights MN
Frederick W. Hyde - New Brighton MN
Todd W. Johnson - Minneapolis MN
Jerald K. Rassmussen - Stillwater MN
Michael G. Williams - Vadnais Heights MN
Assignee:
Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company - St. Paul MN
International Classification:
C07K 116
C07K 118
B01D 1508
B01D 6108
US Classification:
530413
Abstract:
The invention provides a method of separating a biomacromolecule which comprises the steps of providing a separation system including a filter element which comprises a composite filtration medium, the composite filtration medium comprising a filtration layer on the upstream surface of which are located insoluble stationary phase particulates, the particulates being capable of binding to a biomacromolecule or class of biomacromolecules, a reservoir containing a solution mixture comprising at least one biomacromolecule as solute, and a pump and associated tubing to form a closed loop assembly, and recirculation pumping the solution mixture through the filter cartridge so as to bind the at least one biomacromolecule to the stationary phase particulate so as to form a biomacromolecule:stationary phase particulate product. An eluting solution can be pumped through the closed loop assembly which is capable of reversing the biomacromolecule:stationary phase particulate product binding interaction so as to liberate the biomacromolecule.

Cartridge Filters With Insoluble Enzyme Particulates Contained Thereon

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US Patent:
56141050, Mar 25, 1997
Filed:
Apr 20, 1995
Appl. No.:
8/425585
Inventors:
Steven M. Heilmann - Afton MN
Gary J. Drtina - Woodbury MN
Philip D. Eitzman - Woodbury MN
Louis C. Haddad - Mendota Heights MN
Frederick W. Hyde - New Brighton MN
Todd W. Johnson - Minneapolis MN
Assignee:
Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company - St. Paul MN
International Classification:
B01D 3700
US Classification:
210767
Abstract:
Insolubilized enzyme particulates are located on the upstream surface of a filtration layer of a filtering element which can be used in a cartridge filter. Employed in a recycling flow reaction system at relatively high flux rates, the cartridges are useful for conducting catalyzed chemical reactions of dissolved solutes, for example, esterifications, isomerizations, oxidations, reductions, and cyclizations.
Philip Drake Eitzman from Lake Elmo, MN, age ~67 Get Report